Clay tablets from the cradle of civilisation provide new insight to the history of medicine

Ancient “doctors” mixed magic and medicine to heal patients.  Before the Greeks excelled in science and philosophy, the culture was blooming in Mesopotamia, located between the Euphrates River and the Tigris River in present-day Iraq. This region, known as the cradle of civilization, was the seat of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, which lasted from around 900 to 612 BCE. Some historians consider the kingdom to be the first true empire in history and many Assyrian kings and cities are described in The Old Testament. A Danish Ph.D. student has now analyzed clay tablets from the Kingdom’s heyday, in which a man called Kisir-Ashur documents his education to become a doctor, and how he combined magical rituals with medical treatments.

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About Giorgio Bertini

Research Professor. Founder Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++
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