Author Archives: Giorgio Bertini

About Giorgio Bertini

Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++

The Neolithic Revolution: How Farming changed the World

Whenever we think of famous revolutions, the two that normally pop into our heads are the French and American Revolutions, mostly because they are responsible for the political and intellectual landscape that dominates the world today. Both of these revolutions … Continue reading

Posted in Agriculture, Ancient, Evolution, Farmers | Tagged , , ,

The Beginnings of Human History, Society, and Culture

When does human history begin? If we seek help from anthropology, then we find that the first animals of the homininans appeared in Africa around 6 million years ago and the first Homo sapiens appeared 600,000 to 200,000 years ago, … Continue reading

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The Human Story – From Hunter-Gatherers to Farmers

Since the emergence of Homo erectus 2 million years ago, humans remained hunter-gatherers till 10,000 years ago. During this long period of 2 million years, humans learned to tame fire, hunt, make better stone tools, and explore new territories. Homo … Continue reading

Posted in Farmers, Humans, Hunter-gatherer | Tagged , ,

Neanderthals live on in Human Ggenes — how they shaped us?

Understanding our ancient ancestors may help us better address health risks today. By understanding more about these prehistoric people, we can learn about who we are as a species today. Our ancestors’ experiences shaped us, and they may still hold … Continue reading

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How Humans Evolved Supersize Brains

Scientists have begun to identify the symphony of biological triggers that powered the extraordinary expansion of the human brain. Fossils established the Brain Boom as fact. But they tell us next to nothing about how and why the human brain … Continue reading

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The Cultural power of Tacit Knowledge: Inarticulacy and Bourdieu’s habitus

Tacit knowledge, or knowledge that is inarticulate or unarticulated, lies at the heart of all cultural life, and is exercised in dull and repetitive activities that constitute the heart of daily existence. It seems without much character or importance, but … Continue reading

Posted in Cuisine, Tacit knowlege | Tagged ,

Stone Age

From the dawn of our species to the present day, stone-made artifacts are the dominant form of material remains that have survived to today concerning human technology. The term “Stone Age” was coined in the late 19th century CE by the … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient, Cave art, Cave paintings, Stone age | Tagged , , ,

Chauvet Cave

The Chauvet Cave (also known as the Chauvet-Pont-d’Arc Cave) is a Palaeolithic cave situated near Vallon-Pont-d’Arc in the Ardèche region of southern France that houses impeccably preserved, exquisite examples of prehistoric art. Now reliably dated to between c. 33,000 and … Continue reading

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Prehistoric Hunter-gatherer Societies

Hunter-gatherer societies are – true to their astoundingly descriptive name – cultures in which human beings obtain their food by hunting, fishing, scavenging, and gathering wild plants and other edibles. Although there are still groups of hunter-gatherers in our modern … Continue reading

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Ancient Greek Science

By careful thinking based upon observation, some ancient Greeks realized that it was possible to find regularities and patterns hidden in nature and that those regularities were the key to unlocking the secrets of the universe. It became evident that … Continue reading

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