Author Archives: Giorgio Bertini

About Giorgio Bertini

Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++

Social learning and evolution: the cultural intelligence hypothesis.

If social learning is more efficient than independent individual exploration, animals should learn vital cultural skills exclusively, and routine skills faster, through social learning, provided they actually use social learning preferentially. Animals with opportunities for social learning indeed do so. … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural intelligence, Social learning | Tagged ,

Before the Fall of the Roman Republic, Income Inequality and Xenophobia Threatened Its Foundations

Long before Julius Caesar declared himself dictator for life in 44 B.C., essentially spelling the beginning of the end to the Roman Republic, trouble was brewing in the halls of power. The warning signs were there. Politicians such as Tiberius … Continue reading

Posted in Democracy, Inequality | Tagged ,

Cultural Panthropology

Culture, in the most basic sense of “tradition,” has been shown to exist in many species. There is more to the phenomenon of culture in humans, however than the mere existence of traditions. Thus, rather than expecting that culture can be assigned to … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural panthropology, Culture, Social learning, Traditions | Tagged , , ,

Stone toolmaking and the evolution of human culture and cognition

Although many species display behavioral traditions, human culture is unique in the complexity of its technological, symbolic and social contents. Is this extraordinary complexity a product of cognitive evolution, cultural evolution or some interaction of the two? Answering this question … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural accumulation, Cultural complexity, Cultural diversity, Technology | Tagged , , ,

Modelling population contact and interaction of cultural repertoires

Evidence for interactions between populations plays a prominent role in the reconstruction of historical and prehistoric human dynamics; these interactions are usually interpreted to reflect cultural practices or demographic processes. The sharp increase in long-distance transportation of lithic material between the Middle and Upper … Continue reading

Posted in Connectivity, Cultural accumulation, Population | Tagged , ,

Partial connectivity increases cultural accumulation within groups

Complex technologies used in most human societies are beyond the inventive capacities of individuals. Instead, they result from a cumulative process in which innovations are gradually added to existing cultural traits across many generations. Recent work suggests that a population’s ability to develop complex … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural accumulation, Cultural innovations, Groups | Tagged , ,

The niche construction of cultural complexity

Interactions between innovations, population size, and the environment. Niche construction is a process through which organisms alter their environments and, in doing so, influence or change the selective pressures to which they are subject. ‘Cultural niche construction’ refers specifically to … Continue reading

Posted in Cultural complexity, Cultural innovations, Innovation | Tagged , ,

Understanding and sharing intentions: the origins of cultural cognition

We propose that the crucial difference between human cognition and that of other species is the ability to participate with others in collaborative activities with shared goals and intentions: shared intentionality. Participation in such activities requires not only especially powerful … Continue reading

Posted in Cognition, Cultural cognition, Culture | Tagged , ,

Humans Migrated Out of Africa to Escape Drying Climate

Ancient humans left Africa to escape a drying climate, about 60,000 years ago — a finding that contradicts previous suggestions that humens were able to leave because a then-wet climate allowed them to cross the generally arid Horn of Africa … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient, Climate, Migrations | Tagged , ,

On the evolution of Human Skin color

Most people associate Africans with dark skin. But different groups of people in Africa have almost every skin color on the planet, from deepest black in the Dinka of South Sudan to beige in the San of South Africa. Now, … Continue reading

Posted in Color, Evolution, Skin | Tagged , ,