Author Archives: Giorgio Bertini

About Giorgio Bertini

Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++

Voluntary taxation: a lesson from the Ancient Greeks

I imagine a progressive tax – in other words, a tax that falls on those most able to pay; a tax that results in the rich paying – quite voluntarily – more than they are obliged, instead of trying to … Continue reading

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How Agriculture was Invented During the Stone Age

It is believed that women were the “inventors” of agriculture, as they began applying observations to their gathering in order to maximize their returns. Plant varieties were chosen for their nutritional value and ease of production, and locations were chosen … Continue reading

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The Neolithic Revolution in the Near East: Transforming the Human Landscape

One of humanity’s most important milestones was the transition from hunting and gathering to food production and permanent village life. This Neolithic Revolution first occurred in the Near East, changing the way humans interacted with their environment and each other, … Continue reading

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First farmers had diverse origins

Analysis of DNA from some of the world’s first farmers shows that they had surprisingly diverse origins. Researchers compared the genomes of ancient Neolithic skeletons from across the Near East, where farming began. The results shed light on a debate over whether … Continue reading

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Understanding the Past: Archaeological and Paleoanthropological Methods

A portion of a pig’s tusk, a small sample of volcanic sediment, a battered cobble, a primate’s molar tooth: What do these seemingly unremarkable remains have in common, and more to the point, why are they of interest to paleoanthropologists and archaeologists? First … Continue reading

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Is Violence Embedded in Our DNA?

Some research suggests that throughout our evolution an innate tendency toward fighting shaped human anatomy. But anthropologists are sharply divided on the matter. Whether we take the perspective that evolutionary selection made humans prone to violence matters to our sense of … Continue reading

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How Music and Instruments Began – The story of music is the story of humans

How did music begin? Did our early ancestors first start by beating things together to create rhythm, or use their voices to sing? What types of instruments did they use? Has music always been important in human society, and if … Continue reading

Posted in Evolution, History, Humans, Music | Tagged , , ,

Human evolution: why we’re more than great apes

Palaeoanthropologists have used the anatomical signs of bipedalism to identify our earli­est ancestors, demonstrating our shared genetic heritage with great apes. However, despite this shared history, human evolution set out on a trajectory that has led to significant distinctions from … Continue reading

Posted in Brain, Cultural change, Culture, Human evolution | Tagged , , ,

Famous doctors from the ancient world

Drastic advances in science have caused past medical practices to become not only antiquated but often shocking. Although brilliant medical insights are peppered throughout history, many dated practices are more curious than insightful. From an early take on chemical warfare … Continue reading

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The Lost Knowledge of the Ancients

1500 years ago, people generally believed that the earth was flat and rectangular. However, as early as the 6th century BC Greek philosopher Pythagoras theorized that the Earth must be a sphere and in the 3rd century BC the Greek … Continue reading

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